Working Wise | DrumhellerMail - Page #7
10232018Tue
Last updateMon, 22 Oct 2018 11am

I am about to graduate with a diploma in business administration and I’m eager to find a job. Do you have any tips to help me land my first job?

Dear Working Wise:
I am about to graduate with a diploma in business administration and I’m eager to find a job. Do you have any tips to help me land my first job? Signed, Eager Graduate

Dear Eager:

Congratulations on completing your program. Alberta is full of opportunity right now with the second-lowest unemployment rate in the country. Here are some tips to help you tap into the opportunities and put your education to good use.

Use your school
Ask the chair of your program for advice and suggestions about where to look for jobs. Put your school’s career services office to work for you. They can usually help you with your resumé and job search and employers interested in hiring new graduates often post jobs on their job boards.

Polish your resumé
Recruiters spend as little as 30 seconds glancing at your resumé—does yours scream “I’m perfect for this job”? Check out the resumé tips on the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS) web site at http://bit.ly/ISpj0B. Always include a cover letter with your resumé and use it to quickly explain why you are the perfect candidate for the job. Want an expert opinion on your resumé? Use the free ALIS e-Resumé review service at http://alis.alberta.ca.

Attend job fairs
Did you know that there are job fairs happening all year long around the province? Find out about upcoming job fairs near you at http://employment.alberta.ca/jobfairs.

Like your local Facebook jobs page
Get job opportunities and news of upcoming job fairs sent straight to your Facebook news feed. You can find and like your local Alberta Works Facebook jobs page by clicking on http://bit.ly/IGmZK4.

Network
Fewer than half of all jobs are advertised. Let your network of friends, family, teachers, and former employers know that you are looking for a job. Networking is a great way to tap into the hidden job market. Send everyone you know an email letting them know what kind of job you’re looking for along with a quick summary of your skills, training and experience or a link to your Linked-In profile. And don’t forget to update, clean up, and use your social networking sites.

Expand your job search
Some grads make the mistake of limiting their job search to a specific occupation, industry, or organization type. Take inventory of your transferable skills—like organizational, computer, and time-management skills—and consider opportunities in related occupations and industries. Don’t forget to check out small businesses and not-for-profit organizations.

Register with recruitment agencies
Agencies will not look for a job for you, but they will call you if you are a good match for a position that they are recruiting for. Registering with recruitment agencies is free, takes very little time, and is another great way to tap into the hidden job market. You can start by checking out http://alis.alberta.ca/js/ws/jp/jobpostings/ea.html.

Visit an Alberta Works Centre
Visit your nearest Alberta Works Centre http://humanservices.alberta.ca/offices and ask a Career & Employment Consultant for advice on your job search.

Use ALIS Finding Work
Click on the Job Seekers tab on the ALIS web site http://alis.alberta.ca for more tips on finding a job.

Good luck!

Do you have a work-related question? Send your questions to Working Wise, at charles.strachey@gov.ab.ca. Charles Strachey is a manager with Alberta Human Services. This column is provided for general information.
 


I keep hearing about a shortage of workers in Alberta. I am just about to graduate from high school and want to know which careers will be in demand in the future.

 

Dear Working Wise:

I keep hearing about a shortage of workers in Alberta. I am just about to graduate from high school and want to know which careers will be in demand in the future. Signed, Eager for a career

 

Dear Eager:

 

Albertais expected to have a shortage of approximately 114,000 workers within the decade according to Alberta’s 2011-2021 Occupational Demand and Supply Outlook. But many of these occupations require specialized skills and training.

 

Finding out which careers will be in demand and what training you will need is a great idea. It doesn’t make sense to invest years and thousands of dollars into the wrong post-secondary program.

 

You might find the recently released AlbertaLabour Market Outlook 2013 helpful. The publication covers global trends that are affecting Alberta’s economy, the outlook for our major industries, and a list of occupations that will be in high demand in the near term. The outlook is available at http://eae.alberta.ca/lmi.

 

Current high-demand jobs include:

·   Software Engineers

·   Restaurant & Food Service Managers

·   Construction Managers

·   Residential Home Builders & Renovators

·   Geologists, Geochemists & Geophysicists

·   Civil Engineers

·   Civil Engineering Technologists & Technicians

·   Industrial Instrument Technicians & Mechanics

·   Computer Network Technicians

·   Specialist Physicians

·   General Practitioners & Family Physicians

·   Pharmacists

·   Chefs

·   Cement Finishers

·   Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics

·   Automotive Service Technicians

·   Truck & Bus Mechanics / Repairers

·   Motor Vehicle Body Repairers

·   Delivery Drivers

·   Supervisors in Petroleum, Gas and Chemical Processing and Utilities

 

For a longer-term outlook on Alberta’s labour market, check out the 2011-2021 Occupational Demand and Supply Outlook under forecasts at http://eae.alberta.ca/lmi. The report forecasts what the demand will be nearly 10 years from now for nearly 130 occupations.

 

Once you have narrowed down your career options, you can use the Occupational Information (OCCinfo) database of more than 500 different careers to find out more about the jobs that interest you most.

 

The OCCinfo (http://alis.alberta.ca/occinfo) occupational profiles include key information, including typical: duties, working conditions, salaries, required educational qualifications, appropriate training programs, common employers, employment advancement, and desired personal characteristics.

 

If you would like any more help planning your career, try out CareerInsite, a free online career-planning tool, at https://careerinsite.alberta.ca.

 

Good luck!

 

Do you have a work-related question? Send your questions to Working Wise, at charles.strachey@gov.ab.ca. Charles Strachey is a manger with Alberta Human Services. This column is provided for general information. 

 

During a recent job interview, I was asked if I was planning on getting married soon? I told them “no”, but it seemed like an unnecessary personal question. Are employers allowed to ask such personal questions?

 

Dear Working Wise:

During a recent job interview, I was asked if I was planning on getting married soon? I told them “no”, but it seemed like an unnecessary personal question. Are employers allowed to ask such personal questions? Signed Concerned Young Professional

 

Dear Concerned:

 

No, employers are not allowed to ask you if you are planning to get married. Private information like that is protected under the Alberta Human Rights Act for businesses under provincial jurisdiction.

 

Some employers might not be well informed about this provincial legislation and may unknowingly ask inappropriate questions. You should prepare for this possibility so you are not caught off guard in an interview.

 

Generally, any information that could intentionally or inadvertently be used to discriminate against you cannot be asked. Employers should only be asking you for information that is relevant to your ability to do the job.

 

Employers cannot ask about your:

·   gender, marital status, family status, next of kin, marriage plans or child-care arrangements;

·   source of income, unless it concerns your former employment;

·   maiden name or name origin;

·   age or date of birth, but they can ask if you meet the minimum age requirement for the job, if applicable;

·   previous address, unless it meets a business purpose acceptable under the Act;

·   birthplace or ancestry;

·   height or weight

·   sexual orientation;

·   membership in organizations unrelated to your work, hobbies or interests that would indicate race, religious beliefs, ancestry or place of origin, etc., but employers can ask questions regarding membership in professional organizations related to the position, e.g. APEGGA for engineers;

·   current or past health problems, Workers’ Compensation Board claims, or any absence due to stress or mental illness;

·   citizenship or languages not required for the job;

·   religious beliefs, customs and holidays that you observe; or

·   military service outside Canada, unless there is an acceptable business-related purpose.

 

Employers can not request a photo, which could reveal factors such as race and gender, except in certain circumstances such as a modeling or entertainment position, where this may be acceptable. If an employer requires a photograph for business-related purposes, they can ask for it after an offer of employment has been made.

 

Employers can ask:

·   if you can fulfill work-related requirements, such as working night shifts or lifting heavy items;

·   for any previous names you have had if the information is needed to complete reference checks or verify your past employment or education; and

·   if you are legally permitted to work in Alberta.

 

Three ways to handle inappropriate questions:

1.      Write "not applicable" on the application form, politely refuse to answer the question, or tactfully let the employer know the question is inappropriate;

2.      Answer the question and then discuss the underlying concern that has prompted the question. For example, an employer who asks about your family plans might be wondering if you will be frequently absent. In this case you could address the underlying concern by talking about your excellent attendance record and your ability to do the job; or

3.      Answer only the underlying concern.

 

However you choose to answer, be professional, diplomatic and honest.

 

After you are offered the job and accept it, the employer can ask you for information required for benefit coverage and for employment records.

 

If you have a question about a specific situation or think you might have a complaint, contact the Alberta Human Rights Commission at www.albertahumanrights.ab.ca or toll-free at 780-427-7661.

 

Do you have a work-related question? Send your questions to Working Wise, at charles.strachey@gov.ab.ca. Charles Strachey is a manager with Alberta Human Services. This article is for general information.


Do you usually get a flu shot?