Remembering a forgotten name in Alberta palaeontology | DrumhellerMail
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Country music icon Paul Brandt to play Passion Play Amphitheatre

Canada’s Badlands will play host to iconic Canadian country performer Paul Brandt this summer in the stunning Canadian Badlands Passion Play Amphitheatre August 21st. Paul Brandt is known across Canada as one of the top voices in country music. Since 1997,… Read More
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Vipers make their case for provincials in doubleheader this weekend

The Drumheller Hi-Way 9 Vipers U12 “C” Vipers rolled right through their double header against the Airdrie Aces on Sunday afternoon, and are looking to make a a run at provincials next month. The Vipers crushed the Aces 20-8 in their first game of the series… Read More
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Hellraisers win first home game

The Drumheller Hellraisers were victorious in their first home game. The Hellraisers hosted the Rockyview Bruise Battalion on Saturday June 25 at the Drumheller Memorial Arena. Team member Kyra Reid was ecstatic to report that the Final score was 273 vs 176.… Read More

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Tombstone found among riprap on Red Deer River shore

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While out on her daily walk on the nature trail, along Riverside Drive, Tuesday morning, something strange caught the eyes…

Bottoms up! Almost $1,200 raised for charity at spaghetti eating contest

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BP's annual spaghetti eating contest for charity earlier tonight saw over a dozen hungry eaters dig in and raise almost…

Olympics Day at St. A's

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photos courtesy of St. Anthony's Students at St. Anthony’s are winding down the school year which ends this week, and on…

The Drumheller Mail/inSide Drumheller prepared in event of postal disruption

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In light of a disruption of postal service, The Drumheller Mail/inSide Drumheller is making alternative arrangements for…

Drumheller Institution in lockdown

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On June 23, 2016 at about 7:00 a.m., a lockdown was put in place in the medium security unit at Drumheller Institution, to…

Prince Edward to honour three locals at Duke of Edinburgh ceremony Friday

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Three Drumheller youth who earned gold Duke of Edinburgh awards will be honoured in Calgary Friday by his highness Prince…

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Hellraisers win first home game

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The Drumheller Hellraisers were victorious in their first home game. The Hellraisers hosted the Rockyview Bruise Battalion…

Canadian Badlands Aquatic Club swimmers competing in Summer Games

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The Canadian Badlands Aquatic Club has exciting news concerning some of their swimmers. Annika Lassen and Emily Martin tried…

Gran Fondo Badlands gaining popularity

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The third annual Gran Fondo Badlands event is gearing up to host over 800 cyclists in the valley. This year’s Gran Fondo…

Recovery wins soccer title

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The Drumheller Coed Recreational Soccer League has a new champ as Team Recovery won their first title. The championship…

Finals set for Drumheller rec soccer league

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The season is wrapping up for the Drumheller Co-ed Recreational Soccer league, and upsets are abound. Playoffs began last…

School awarded for providing quality physical education

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St. Anthony’s continues to deliver quality physical education for its students and was once again honoured for this effort.…

Obituaries

Condolences to the family of CALVIN FOSTER TUPPER

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TUPPER, Calvin Foster March 3, 1926 - June 13, 2016 It is with great sadness that we are announcing the passing of our…

Condolences to the family of VERNA MARIE BRINTON

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BRINTON, Verna Marie May 3, 1929 - June 13, 2016 Verna, beloved wife of Howard “Howdy” Brinton (predeceased) of Strathmore,…

Condolences to the family of ETHEL ELENA MOAR

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MOAR, Ethel Elena (nee Shaw, Magee) September 3, 1920 - June 14, 2016 Mom’s journey of life began on September 3, 1920. Mom…

Condolences to the family of JANICE MARIE ALTIN

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ALTIN, Janice Marie 1957-2016 Janice Marie Altin of Hanna, beloved wife of the late Rob Altin, passed away suddenly at home…

Remembering a forgotten name in Alberta palaeontology

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    Harold D’acre (pronounced “Day-ker”) Robinson Lowe  was born in Liverpool, England on February 1, 1886, one of four sons born to Matthew Booth Lowe and his wife Sarah Ann of St. Helen’s, Lancashire, England. The entire family moved to Toronto around 1905 and farmed there.

In 1909 they moved to Alberta and were among the first homesteaders to settle and farm in the Big Stone district, about 50 km NE of today’s Dinosaur Provincial Park (DPP). Farming life was tough on the Lowes with drought, poor crops, Harold’s home burning down, and grass fires burning valuable feed for their animals. The family moved to Youngstown, AB around 1914, where they provided a variety of handyman jobs such as digging cellars; tilling gardens; selling cream separators, horses and coal; breaking and training horses for WWI military use overseas; taxi service; and hauling wagon loads of all types. Around 1920 some of the family (Harold included) moved to Drumheller and for several years ran one of the first bus and taxi companies in that then rough and rowdy coal town. The rest of the Lowe family soon followed suit. Despite being a Drumheller resident, Harold also continued farming his land in the Big Stone district until at least 1923.
    Early in the 1925 Geological Survey of Canada’s (GSC) field season near Tolman Bridge, AB Charles M Sternberg suddenly found himself without a teamster. The departing man recommended Harold Lowe and a field partnership lasting from 1925-1937 was born. Harold was an ideal field man. Though of slight build, years of hard labor on the farm had made him wiry and strong. He was a hard worker familiar with excavation tools and their use, horse and wagon care/operation, loading and hauling heavy wagon loads, and motor vehicle maintenance. Owing to the Great Depression and other interruptions, Harold did not work for Sternberg every year, but did put in six full field seasons (1925-1926,1928,1935-1937), not only in Alberta, but in 1935 also assisted Sternberg in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. While the Royal Ontario Museum worked in Alberta during the Depression, Harold only worked for the GSC under Sternberg’s supervision. In the field he quickly became Sternberg’s “right hand man”.
    After his last field season, Harold had a number of jobs in Drumheller. He was a coal miner at the Hy-Grade Mine, manager of the St. Regis Hotel and then worked at Whitlock Lumber. He and his family (wife Daisy (1889-1973); son Don (1932-); and two daughters Connie (1923-1976) and Georgina (1928·2006)) moved away from Drumheller in 1944, starting a new life in Burnaby, BC. There he worked as a caretaker and maintenance man at a restaurant and later was a shipper/receiver at a car parts dealership. He suffered a fatal heart attack on September 5, 1952, age 66 (Anonymous, 1952a-b). The former Lowe home in Drumheller still exists and is now converted into the Old Grouch’s Restaurant, a popular hangout for some Tyrrell Museum staff.
    Harold’s name briefly comes up in several published histories of early dinosaur collecting in Alberta (Russell, 1966:26; Dodson, 1996:160; Spalding, 1999:89). The taxonomically problematic centrosaurine Monoclonius Lowei was named after him, the only civilian so honoured by M Sternberg who erected 37 new species of western Canadian dinosaurs or dinosaur ichnospecies.
    Despite these recognitions, who Harold Lowe was and his full contributions to Albertan vertebrate palaeontology are largely lost on most of the palaeontological community. This note is excised from a much larger and nearly completed project on the Albertan palaeontological contributions of Harold Lowe which will be published elsewhere (Tanke, in prep.). During Harold’s fieldwork in Alberta he made some significant ceratopsian discoveries and/or helped collect same in four of the six summers he was employed by the GSC. These are briefly reviewed here:
    1925
    Downstream of the Tolman Bridge, Harold finds and helps collect CMN 8882 ceratopsian scattered skull, jaws and teeth. This specimen has not been prepared and Sternberg considered it as “possibly not Anchiceratops”. Harold also helps excavate CMN 8547 a ct. Anchiceratops complete postcranial skeleton with fragments of frill. This is the panel mounted specimen which has been on display at the Canadian Museum of Nature (Ottawa) since about 1927.
    1928
    In today’s DPP, Harold finds and helps collect CMN 8801 (quarry 63) Chasmosaurus russelli, skull and partial skeleton.
    1936
    Work was again conducted in DPP. CM Sternberg’s 1936 field notes (Sternberg, 1936) for July 8 mention Harold collecting a ~small crest” of a ceratopsian, but no other details are given. A ceratopsian skeleton (possibly quarry 98) was explored July 29 and abandoned the next day.
    Fieldwork was also done in support of dinosaur exhibits underway at the Calgary Zoo Prehistoric Park. Dinosaur specimens (including ceratopsian) were collected by Harold and crew 10 create a simulated bonebed exhibit at the Zoo.
    1937
    This was Harold’s last summer of fieldwork and the most successful one for the discovery and collection of ceratopsians. In the Manyberries/Onefour, AB district the following specimens were secured: Field No. 1-1937. Monoclonius· partial skull (later discarded due to poor quality). CMN 8802. Chasmosaurus russelli skull and lower jaws. Described in Sternberg, 1940 and accidentally destroyed jaws saved during a move. CMN 8797. Scattered pieces of small centrosaurine ceratopsian skull: left side of face with orbital rim; ?frontal, prefrontal, jugal, squamosal. MN 9813. Part of crest. Found by Harold and described by Langston as Anchiceratops. . Parts of small centrosaurine ceratopsian skull: 2 squamosa Is, part of parietals, 1 quadrate, 1 ?prefrontal, 2 postorbitals, 2 horncores and other skull pieces; found by Harold. CMN 8790. “Monoc/onius· skull. Described in Sternberg, 1940 as Monoc/onius lowei; named after Harold. Field No. 16-1937. Large orbital horn core; rest of fragmentary skull not collected.

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