Remembering a forgotten name in Alberta palaeontology | DrumhellerMail
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Tri Line Carriers Truck Fire

Fire stops long haul garbage run

On the evening of Wednesday March 22, 2017 at approximately 6:40 pm, a Tri-Line Carriers GP Inc. truck was hauling garbage on Highway 9 East towards Drumheller when the driver noticed smoke billowing out of the Trailer. A dozen Rockyford & District… Read More
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Town supports residents affected by flood

The Town of Drumheller is working with the province to extend support to affected residents of the Rosebud River and Hwy 10X area. Director of Protective Services Greg Peters highlighted that the residents in need were in good hands and extended his support.… Read More
RCMP new cruiser Sept 2014

Police investigate vehicle theft near Carbon

The Drumheller RCMP are warning residents not to put themselves in harm’s way when crime strikes. This comes after an investigation into the theft of a motor vehicle last night near Carbon. On March 21 at 10 p.m., the Drumheller RCMP received a call of a… Read More

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Fire destroys home on Wayne Road

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A home that was damaged in the recent floods along Highway 10X was destroyed by fire overnight. Firefighters from the…

New Chopped Leaf Restaurant opening in Drumheller this summer

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The Bosch family has announced their newest venture. Braden Bosch confirmed Sunday that they will be opening a Chopped Leaf…

River ice jam releases

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The ice jam has released and river levels are subsiding.The Town and Utility Companies continue to provide assistance to…

Town monitors local flooding issues

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Levels in the Red Deer River and Rosebud River rose over the weekend due to an ice jam. Crews were called out at 8.30 PM on…

Ice jams cause localized flooding

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Waters are subsiding this morning along the Rosebud River and the Red Deer River Sunday morning, but that was not before…

Carbon School Jumps Rope for Heart

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On February 17, 2017, all Carbon School students participated in Jump Rope for Heart as a part of their Team Challenge Day.…

More Local Sports

Dragons hoping for healthy post season

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The Dragons are hoping to heal up this week to be a force to be reckoned come the playoffs. The Dragons have been limping…

Junior A Girls Dynos advance to league final

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he DVSS Junior A Girls Basketball team is on their way to the league finals. The Grade 8-9 Dynos have had a strong finish to…

Dragons form management committee

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The Drumheller Dragons are proud to announce that team ownership has formed a Management Committee to formally govern the…

Morrin curlers looking for provincial three-peat

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Morrin School continues to dominate the curling world and is heading back to the provincials. The girl’s high school team…

Canalta Novice Raptors end regular season with victory

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The Canalta Novice Raptors ended the regular season Saturday morning on a high note, topping Brooks. The Raptors have been…

Dynos boys junior B compete at DVSS tournament

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The boys Junior B Dynos Basketball team played during the tournament held at DVSS over the weekend of February 10 and 11.…

Obituaries

Condolences to the family of Ted Kohut

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KOHUT, Ted 1943 ~ 2017 Ted Kenneth Kohut, beloved husband of Susan Kohut of Medicine Hat, Alberta passed away on Thursday,…

Condolences to the family of Reginald (Reg) Hunter

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HUNTERReginald Watson January 14, 1938- March 17, 2017 It is with the utmost sadness that we announce the passing of Reg…

Condolences to the family of Anthony ((Tony) Metz

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Metz, Anthony (Tony) June 8, 1937 – March 14, 2017 Anthony (Tony) Metz passed away peacefully with his daughter Nicole Metz…

Condolences to the family of Arlene Hamilton

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HAMILTONArlene March 16, 2017 Arlene Hamilton passed away peacefully at Drumheller Health Centre on March 16th, 2017. She…

Remembering a forgotten name in Alberta palaeontology

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    Harold D’acre (pronounced “Day-ker”) Robinson Lowe  was born in Liverpool, England on February 1, 1886, one of four sons born to Matthew Booth Lowe and his wife Sarah Ann of St. Helen’s, Lancashire, England. The entire family moved to Toronto around 1905 and farmed there.

In 1909 they moved to Alberta and were among the first homesteaders to settle and farm in the Big Stone district, about 50 km NE of today’s Dinosaur Provincial Park (DPP). Farming life was tough on the Lowes with drought, poor crops, Harold’s home burning down, and grass fires burning valuable feed for their animals. The family moved to Youngstown, AB around 1914, where they provided a variety of handyman jobs such as digging cellars; tilling gardens; selling cream separators, horses and coal; breaking and training horses for WWI military use overseas; taxi service; and hauling wagon loads of all types. Around 1920 some of the family (Harold included) moved to Drumheller and for several years ran one of the first bus and taxi companies in that then rough and rowdy coal town. The rest of the Lowe family soon followed suit. Despite being a Drumheller resident, Harold also continued farming his land in the Big Stone district until at least 1923.
    Early in the 1925 Geological Survey of Canada’s (GSC) field season near Tolman Bridge, AB Charles M Sternberg suddenly found himself without a teamster. The departing man recommended Harold Lowe and a field partnership lasting from 1925-1937 was born. Harold was an ideal field man. Though of slight build, years of hard labor on the farm had made him wiry and strong. He was a hard worker familiar with excavation tools and their use, horse and wagon care/operation, loading and hauling heavy wagon loads, and motor vehicle maintenance. Owing to the Great Depression and other interruptions, Harold did not work for Sternberg every year, but did put in six full field seasons (1925-1926,1928,1935-1937), not only in Alberta, but in 1935 also assisted Sternberg in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. While the Royal Ontario Museum worked in Alberta during the Depression, Harold only worked for the GSC under Sternberg’s supervision. In the field he quickly became Sternberg’s “right hand man”.
    After his last field season, Harold had a number of jobs in Drumheller. He was a coal miner at the Hy-Grade Mine, manager of the St. Regis Hotel and then worked at Whitlock Lumber. He and his family (wife Daisy (1889-1973); son Don (1932-); and two daughters Connie (1923-1976) and Georgina (1928·2006)) moved away from Drumheller in 1944, starting a new life in Burnaby, BC. There he worked as a caretaker and maintenance man at a restaurant and later was a shipper/receiver at a car parts dealership. He suffered a fatal heart attack on September 5, 1952, age 66 (Anonymous, 1952a-b). The former Lowe home in Drumheller still exists and is now converted into the Old Grouch’s Restaurant, a popular hangout for some Tyrrell Museum staff.
    Harold’s name briefly comes up in several published histories of early dinosaur collecting in Alberta (Russell, 1966:26; Dodson, 1996:160; Spalding, 1999:89). The taxonomically problematic centrosaurine Monoclonius Lowei was named after him, the only civilian so honoured by M Sternberg who erected 37 new species of western Canadian dinosaurs or dinosaur ichnospecies.
    Despite these recognitions, who Harold Lowe was and his full contributions to Albertan vertebrate palaeontology are largely lost on most of the palaeontological community. This note is excised from a much larger and nearly completed project on the Albertan palaeontological contributions of Harold Lowe which will be published elsewhere (Tanke, in prep.). During Harold’s fieldwork in Alberta he made some significant ceratopsian discoveries and/or helped collect same in four of the six summers he was employed by the GSC. These are briefly reviewed here:
    1925
    Downstream of the Tolman Bridge, Harold finds and helps collect CMN 8882 ceratopsian scattered skull, jaws and teeth. This specimen has not been prepared and Sternberg considered it as “possibly not Anchiceratops”. Harold also helps excavate CMN 8547 a ct. Anchiceratops complete postcranial skeleton with fragments of frill. This is the panel mounted specimen which has been on display at the Canadian Museum of Nature (Ottawa) since about 1927.
    1928
    In today’s DPP, Harold finds and helps collect CMN 8801 (quarry 63) Chasmosaurus russelli, skull and partial skeleton.
    1936
    Work was again conducted in DPP. CM Sternberg’s 1936 field notes (Sternberg, 1936) for July 8 mention Harold collecting a ~small crest” of a ceratopsian, but no other details are given. A ceratopsian skeleton (possibly quarry 98) was explored July 29 and abandoned the next day.
    Fieldwork was also done in support of dinosaur exhibits underway at the Calgary Zoo Prehistoric Park. Dinosaur specimens (including ceratopsian) were collected by Harold and crew 10 create a simulated bonebed exhibit at the Zoo.
    1937
    This was Harold’s last summer of fieldwork and the most successful one for the discovery and collection of ceratopsians. In the Manyberries/Onefour, AB district the following specimens were secured: Field No. 1-1937. Monoclonius· partial skull (later discarded due to poor quality). CMN 8802. Chasmosaurus russelli skull and lower jaws. Described in Sternberg, 1940 and accidentally destroyed jaws saved during a move. CMN 8797. Scattered pieces of small centrosaurine ceratopsian skull: left side of face with orbital rim; ?frontal, prefrontal, jugal, squamosal. MN 9813. Part of crest. Found by Harold and described by Langston as Anchiceratops. . Parts of small centrosaurine ceratopsian skull: 2 squamosa Is, part of parietals, 1 quadrate, 1 ?prefrontal, 2 postorbitals, 2 horncores and other skull pieces; found by Harold. CMN 8790. “Monoc/onius· skull. Described in Sternberg, 1940 as Monoc/onius lowei; named after Harold. Field No. 16-1937. Large orbital horn core; rest of fragmentary skull not collected.

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