Working Wise | DrumhellerMail - Page #8
01192018Fri
Last updateFri, 19 Jan 2018 5pm

I didn’t get the Marketing Assistant job that I applied for recently and I got the impression that they thought I was over-qualified. I have just completed my MBA plus I have some related experience. The fact is, though, I need a job. Do you have any advi

 

 

Dear Working Wise:

I didn’t get the Marketing Assistant job that I applied for recently and I got the impression that they thought I was over-qualified. I have just completed my MBA plus I have some related experience. The fact is, though, I need a job. Do you have any advice? Signed, Eager to work

 

Dear Eager:

 

Yes, it’s possible that the employer decided not to hire you because they thought you were overqualified.

 

The employer may have been concerned that you will:

·         Expect a quick promotion;

·         Want more money than other applicants;

·         Leave as soon as you find a better job;

·         Have had performance issues at your last job;

·         Become bored with the job too quickly;

·         Want to take their job.

 

However, there are many good reasons people apply for jobs that they are overqualified for, including:

·         New graduates with a lot of education, but limited experience;

·         Recent immigrants who need Canadian work experience or need to support themselves while they earn their Canadian credentials;

·         Changes in your personal life, including a family relocation;

·         Desire for less responsibility/overtime and better work-life balance;

·         Desire to change careers or work after retirement.

 

Here are some tips to help you reassure employers and get them excited about hiring you:

·         Target your resumé to the position and company’s needs--focus on how your experience will benefit the organization. Keep it short—two pages or less.

·         Focus on employers who will value your skills and experience—highlight them.  

·         Develop a career plan with clear goals.

·         Be ready for the question, “Aren’t you overqualified for this job?” Explain why you want this job and how it fits into your long-term career plan.

·         Reasons you want this job could include: new career direction, new industry, new skills, excited about the company, attracted by the job duties, need Canadian work experience, or you are looking for better work-life balance, etc.

·         Show your excitement for the job and how you can contribute.

·         Let the interviewer set the tone and lead the interview to show that you have no problem taking direction and have no plans to take over.

·         Talk about situations where you have worked successfully with co-workers who had various levels of skill and experience.

·         Ask the interviewer(s) if they have any remaining doubts that you are the perfect person for this job.

 

If you want any other job search tips or advice, check out the tip sheets on the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS) web site at http://alis.alberta.ca.

 

Good luck!

 

Do you have a work-related question? Send your questions to Working Wise, at charles.strachey@gov.ab.ca. Charles Strachey is a regional manager with Alberta Human Services. This column is provided for general information.

 


Do you have any tips for new employees? I’m constantly surprised that I have to explain basic workplace etiquette to the new people that I hire for my restaurant.

Dear Working Wise:

Do you have any tips for new employees? I’m constantly surprised that I have to explain basic workplace etiquette to the new people I hire for my restaurant. Signed Regretful Restaurateur  

 

Dear Regretful:

 

Workplaces have different expectations than schools or homes. Since every workplace has slightly different norms, you might want to create a list of your expectations for all staff. Most of us don’t want to disappoint our bosses—explaining your expectations up front will save you time and frustration and save your staff unnecessary stress.

 

For anyone starting a new job, here are some general tips on how to make a good first impression with your new boss and coworkers.

 

Impress your boss:

·         Arrive 10 minutes early every day—ready and eager to work.

·         Bring a smile and positive attitude with you to work.

·         Provide excellent customer/client service.

·         Dress, speak and behave the way your supervisor does. If you’re not sure about your supervisor’s expectations, ask.

·         Come to work clean and well-groomed every day.

·         Keep your clothes and shoes neat, clean and in good repair.

·         Keep perfume, aftershave, and make-up to a minimum.

·         Minimize tattoos/jewellery—you may not have to do it, but it usually helps make a good impression.

·         Wear/use the special clothing or equipment (e.g., nametag, hardhat, hairnet, etc.) that you are asked to even if your coworkers don’t.

·         Show some pride in your new employer—wear a branded shirt or hat to work if it’s appropriate.

·         Follow your workplace’s cell phone, email, and Internet guidelines.

·         Respect your supervisor’s authority and expertise.

·         Know your hours of work and break times and follow them even if your coworkers don’t.

·         Ask questions when you are unsure, accept constructive criticism, take responsibility for your mistakes and learn from them.

·         Follow policy and procedures, work safely, and complete tasks the way you were taught by your supervisor.

 

Impress your coworkers:

·         Greet coworkers with a smile and a firm handshake, learn their names, and make an effort to get along.

·         Treat everyone with respect regardless of who they are or their status in the company.

·         Be a team player—complete the tasks you are assigned and offer your help to coworkers who need it.

·         Don’t invade personal space—in Canada that’s approximately 90 cm.

·         Avoid slang, foul language, inappropriate humour or controversial comments.

·         Be friendly with your coworkers without giving too much detail or asking questions that are too personal.

·         Avoid negative coworkers and gossip.

·         Keep an open mind and a sense of humour.

·         Keep your work area tidy and personal items to a minimum.

·         Do little things that matter to your coworkers like making a fresh pot of coffee, picking up coffee or lunch for others, tidying up the break room, or refilling the photocopier or water cooler.

 

Avoid becoming one of your supervisor’s ‘regrets’. A good first impression will help you become an accepted contributing member of the team faster and keep your career moving forward.

 

If this is your first job, check out http://alis.alberta.ca/ep/eps/tips/tips.html?EK=12371 to learn more about rules around wages, paid holidays, vacation pay, and breaks.

 

Do you have a work-related question? Send your questions to Working Wise, at charles.strachey@gov.ab.ca. Charles Strachey is a manager with Alberta Human Services. This column is provided for general information.

 

I am looking for a way to make a little extra money. I work part time and I’m saving for a new car. I was thinking about applying for one of those work-from-home jobs that I keep seeing on the Internet. Some seem too good to be true, though, and I’m worri

 

Dear Working Wise:

 

I am looking for a way to make a little extra money. I work part time and I’m saving for a new car. I was thinking about applying for one of those work-from-home jobs that I keep seeing on the Internet. Some seem too good to be true, though, and I’m worried they are a scam. How can I tell which are safe and which are not? Signed, Cautious

 

Dear Cautious:

You are right to be wary. The Internet is filled with work-from-home scams masquerading as real jobs and business opportunities.

 

Don’t buy yourself a job—Beware if they ask for money up front for things like application fees and mailing lists or to purchase instructions, materials or equipment.

 

Research the company—Check with your local Better Business Bureau to see if there are any complaints. Try to talk to someone who used to work for the company and find out what it’s really like. Perform an Internet search for the company’s name or your recruiter’s name to see what pops up.

 

Avoid common job scams—there’s an App for that. The Scam Detector application (http://scam-detector.com) provides a top 10 list of the latest scams in partnership with the Better Business Bureau of Central and Northern Alberta. They feature an entire section on employment scams on their website.  

 

Mystery/Secret Shopper scams are still common in Canada according to the Canadian Anti Fraud Centre. Legitimate mystery-shopper companies exist, but some fraudsters use this type of employment to steal your cash or your identity. Check out the centre’s website www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca for tips on spotting fraudulent offers.

 

Top 10 Red flags to watch for:

1.      They want money up front;

2.      You don’t have a good feeling about it;

3.      The job title, duties and compensation are vague;

4.      The job offer is a spam e-mail or a web-banner advertisement;

5.      You are required to repackage items sent to you and ship them abroad;

6.      The company is hard to identify, locate, or contact via telephone and e-mail;

7.      Unprofessional: poor grammar, spelling, web design, webmail e-mail address;

8.      You are required to transfer or wire money out of your personal bank account;

9.      They want your Social Insurance Number or banking/credit information right away;

10.  Seems too good to be true: guaranteed big money, no risk, no experience needed.

 

Create your own work from home job—Technological advances, and potential cost savings, are making more companies open to the idea of employees working from home. If you really want a second job where you can work from home, you might want to try applying for traditional jobs that you can do from home and then pitch the idea of telecommuting.

 

For more tips on preventing fraud, check out the Central and Northern Alberta Better Business Bureau’s 10 Red Flags You Are Being Scammed at http://edmonton.bbb.org/article/10-red-flags-you-are-being-scammed-16627.

 

March is Fraud Prevention Month. For tips and information on Fraud Prevention Month, visit the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at www.phonebusters.com.

 

Good luck!

 

Do you have a work-related question? Send your questions to Working Wise, at charles.strachey@gov.ab.ca. Charles Strachey is a manager with Alberta Human Services. This column is provided for general information.


Do you take time to watch Drumheller Town Council broadcasts?