I am 46 years old and I have worked since I was a teenager, mostly in warehousing. I want to get a better-paying job—possibly with a pension, but I’m not sure how. Is there any help available? Is it too late? | DrumhellerMail
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Last updateTue, 22 May 2018 8pm

I am 46 years old and I have worked since I was a teenager, mostly in warehousing. I want to get a better-paying job—possibly with a pension, but I’m not sure how. Is there any help available? Is it too late?

 

Dear Working Wise:

 

I am 46 years old and I have worked since I was a teenager, mostly in warehousing. I want to get a better-paying job—possibly with a pension, but I’m not sure how. Is there any help available? Is it too late? Signed, Need a Raise    

 

Dear Need a Raise:

 

No, it’s not too late to look at your options and find a career that fits your needs.

 

Many people mistakenly think that career planning is something that you do at the start of your career and never do again, but ongoing career management is becoming increasingly important.

 

The world of work is becoming more complex as we move toward a knowledge-based economy—more jobs and employers are requiring workers with post-secondary education and training.

 

The needs of workers are also changing—what we want from our jobs tends to shift as we age, start families, or near retirement.

 

Alberta Works Week, April 29 – May 3, is a great opportunity to take a little time to revisit your career plan and ensure that you are still on track.

 

I recommend that you take in some of the more than 80 career events that are happening in Alberta Works Centres around the province during Alberta Works Week. You can find out more about all the job fairs and career workshops at: http://alis.alberta.ca/aww.

 

There are even special events being held for mature workers and students.

 

You can also visit your nearest Alberta Works Centre—any time of the year—and ask to meet with a Career and Employment Consultant. Your consultant can help you discover your strengths, identify your transferable skills, and explore your work preferences to help you find a suitable new career direction.

 

Career and Employment Consultants have helpful information on hundreds of careers including salary, current demand, working conditions and required training.

 

Once you have found a new path, your consultant can advise you on any additional training you require and how to get it.

 

If you have the training you need, your consultant can help you with your job search, including connecting you with free workshops on searching for a new job, writing your resumé, and preparing for job interviews.

 

Consultants can provide information on local employers who may be hiring for positions that would be a good fit for you.

 

Your Career and Employment Consultant can also show you the handy free job-search tools that are available in Alberta Works Centres located across the province, including:

·         Computers with Internet access;

·         Job postings and the Job Bank www.jobbank.gc.ca;

·         Telephone, fax, and photocopiers;

·         Resumé and job-interview workshops;

·         Referrals to local employers who are hiring; and

·         Mini Job Fairs held right in the Alberta Works Centre.

 

To find the Alberta Works Centre nearest you, visit http://humanservices.alberta.ca/offices.

 

Good Luck!

 

Do you have a work-related question? Send your questions to Working Wise, at charles.strachey@gov.ab.ca. Charles Strachey is a manager with Alberta Human Services. This column is provided for general information.

 


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